Minibeasts!

Minibeasts!

As part of our ‘Minibeasts’ topic, we welcomed five new members to our class. We are hoping in about four weeks we will have five Painted Lady butterflies to release in our playground. In the meantime we are watching and recording how fast they grow.

Prep Dance Team

Prep Dance Team

The Prep Dance Team with their Ulster Fitness and Dance Championship winners' medals. A huge thank you to Charlotte Ballantine and congratulations to all the pupils. So proud.

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Bangor Speech and Drama Festival

Bangor Speech and Drama Festival

Congratulations to Lizzie from Prep 2, who won third place at Bangor Speech and Drama Festival for her performance of 'A Lonely Dragon' by Theresa Heine.

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PREP 3 Chinese Restaurant and Senior School

PREP 3 Chinese Restaurant and Senior School

Some students from the main school visited our Prep 3 Chinese Restaurant as part of their Health and Social Care course. They were treated to some delicious food, (handmade by us) and we told them all about Chinese New Year.

Senior School came to visit!

Senior School came to visit!

As part of their Health and Social Care course, some of the main school pupils came to Prep 2 to listen to their reading and take part in talking and listening activities. Prep 2 really enjoyed the visit from 'the Grammars'!

The Alzheimer's Society

The Alzheimer's Society

On the 15th December 2017 the Prep Department held an Elf Day to raise money for The Alzheimer's Society. We had visiting speakers from The Alzheimer's Society come into speak to us about what the money raised would be used for and what it is like to live with someone with dementia. The whole department (including teachers) dressed as elves for the day. We all learnt a lot and had lots of fun too. In total over £110 pounds was raised for this worthy cause. 

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European Languages Day

As part of European Languages Day, Prep 2 and 3 completed a challenge to make European flags out of Lego bricks. 

Update for October / November!

Update for October / November!

Funsie in a Onesie Day 2016 - 28/10/2016

Click below to watch our Funsie in a Onesie video!
https://www.facebook.com/RHSPREP/videos/1779803968974967/

2015 - 2016 Pupil Council Members - 10/11/2016

We would like to say a big thank you to our 2015-2016 pupil council members. You've been fabulous and have made our school even more exciting with all your ideas and events. 

2016 - 2017 Pupil Council Members - 14/11/2016

A very big welcome to our new 2016 - 2017 Pupil Council!

PREP 3 - Victoria Hagan and Leo Morris
PREP 4 - Eoin Thornton and India Nelson
PREP 5 - Hattie Stephens and Eve Whyte
PREP 6 - Molly Menagh and Ashton Morris
PREP 7 - Nicky Scott and Eve Milliken

A huge congratulations to all the boys and girls!

Regent House Grammar School Drama Production - 14/11/2016

We would like to congratulate Rhianna-Katie Paul & Niamh Thornton (Prep 7) for their performances in the 2016 Regent House Grammar School Drama Production of Oliver. You were amazing! 

Irish Open Elite Gymnastics Competition

Irish Open Elite Gymnastics Competition

A Massive congratulations to Carter Conn (Prep 5) for his amazing achievements at the Irish Open Elite Gymnastics Competition at the weekend. He came 1st overall in Level 1 men's gymnastics.

He also won:

  • 1st parallel bars
  • 2nd rings
  • 2nd high bar
  • 3rd vault
  • 3rd pommel
  • 4th floor
  • 4th PPP

Swim Ulster Schools' Cup & Championships 2016

Swim Ulster Schools' Cup & Championships 2016

Two Prep pupils, Nicky & Aaron Scott competed in the Swim Ulster Schools' Cup & Championships 2016! 

Nicky got two personal bests in the 50m back stroke and 100m Individual Medley.

Aaron got into the final of the 50m butterfly and came forth.

Congratulations to them both!

After School Clubs

After School Clubs

Dear Parent

Welcome to a new school year.  I hope you had an enjoyable and relaxing summer holiday!  Below is a list of after school clubs for this autumn term and attached is a yearly overview of clubs on offer......

The Ark Open Farm

The Ark Open Farm

On Thursday 7th April 2016 Prep 1 and 3 visited The Ark Open Farm. Have a look at our photographs! 

Farm to Fork

Farm to Fork

On Friday 29th April Prep 1, 2 & 3 took part in a ‘Farm to Fork’ workshop at Tesco Castlebawn. The ‘Farm to Fork’ initiative helps children learn where their food comes from by exploring the fruit and vegetable aisle, the bakery and fish counters and chillers, as well as tasting some exciting new food. The children had a super day! A massive thank you to Campbell Keating at Tesco Castlebawn for inviting us along. 

World Book Day!

World Book Day!

We had great fun dressing up as our favorite literary characters as part of World Book Day celebrations. Look below to see images of the day. It is unclear whether the staff or the pupils had the most fun dressing up!

Rebecca's Gap Year

Rebecca's Gap Year

Rebecca Kennedy left Regent House in June 2015 and embarked on a gap year with Project Trust to the Dominican Republic– her first blog can be by clicking here

“I’ve now been here for over 12 weeks, and I apologise to all those who have been wanting to hear about my time here in Bombita, Dominican Republic, but to be honest, it doesn’t feel like all that time has just gone by. The days are so jam packed that it’s difficult to find down time. For example, a normal day consists of getting up at a quarter past 7, to shower in the dribble that is our shower, and be in time for fila at a quarter to 8. At Fila, the whole school stands in their classes and sings the school song and the national anthem as they raise the flag (if someone remembers to take it down the night before!). There is usually a talk and a prayer, and then we’re off to our first class at 8:15. Yes you heard me, school starts at 8:15 here. 

Kirsty (my partner in a figurative project trust marriage) and I both share a house and a classroom, so at least if one of us has a difficult class, the other can stay and help. The number of classes I have a day can vary from 1 to 6 but the craziness of the kids doesn’t really change from full on crazy! I say that, but they can be really cute, when you don’t spend half an hour trying to get them out of the classroom after class has ended! When you walk down the street or even in the school, you get kids running up to you and clinging to you and hugging you. They always seem so happy to see the ‘Americanas’.

Here in the Dominican Republic, there are four possible nationalities you can be: Dominican, Haitian, American or Chinese. This basically means that if you tell them you are from Northern Ireland, they think it’s a place in America! 

School finishes at 4, and after that, we go for a walk around the metro. The metro is a reservoir where the locals farm fish, swim, bathe, and do their laundry, all with an amazing view of the surrounding mountains and sugarcane fields. 

I can’t say I’ve improved my Spanish as I didn’t have any when I got here, but in the past eight weeks I’ve come from only being able to say ‘hola’, ‘buenos Dias’, and ‘me llamo Rebecca!’, to being able to teach classes, and have simple conversions! 

My first week here consisted of studying Spanish from 9 until 3, everyday in preparation for my first lessons on the following Monday. I was expecting a couple of classes, and had plans for all of them, and scripts for anything I might need to say in the class. I no longer need to script lessons as nearly all my Spanish is geared towards teaching. It’s a huge relief, as my first script took me over an hour to prepare! And even though I only taught one of my four scheduled classes, I was completely exhausted afterwards! The classroom’s fans don’t work so you have to teach in a full classroom of at least 30 kids plus the heat and humidity. Even now, when you haven’t really done anything strenuous all day, you still get incredibly tired by 10 o’clock, and as it gets dark early here, and there’s no TV and often no internet, you just go to bed. As we’ve gotten used to the lifestyle, it’s easier to occupy ourselves in the evenings, which mainly includes going out and socialising or cooking.

Socialising here, basically means either sitting in the street chatting in Spanish, or cooking together as cooking here takes a lot of effort and is a major part of the day. We are usually asked to bring some ingredients and contribute to the meal, or they come over and cook in our house. The food here is incredible!!!! And incredibly fried and sugary! Everything is fried or has about 10 spoonfuls of sugar added to it. The coffee here is like a shot of coffee syrup, so forget about having any nice cappuccinos after your meal! Also, the main staple foods are rice, and plantain (which are twice fried for extra flavour).

Although we are into October now, and term started 8 weeks ago, we are still having trouble with the timetable! I still haven’t taught a full week of classes yet due to unexpected days off, clashes in the timetable and lunch consistently running over by an hour! People here are so laid back, and so it’s taken so long to get an almost organised timetable! (I don’t really mind though, I mean who’s going to complain when they get a break from teaching!) 

On Fridays, we go to barahona for the week’s shop, which usually costs around 1000 pesos, or £15. Some things are incredibly cheap here, like eggs and sugar. But we’ve now learned to avoid the cereal aisle, as anything on those shelves will inevitably be out of our price range! We then usually go and stay in la Hoya with Chynah and Alisha, who are also project trust volunteers working for COPA but in another school that COPA runs. We often go to the beach on Saturday or Sunday (usually San Rafael) and plan lessons on the other day. 

Every month, the COPA mission flight comes in, and that means we get parcels and letters from home! Everyone gets really excited as it feels almost like Christmas comes every month. We all ask for certain things that you can’t get here, mainly chocolate and cereal as they are both either very expensive or not nice. 

Bombita is starting to feel very much like home, and I feel a lot more comfortable here than when I first arrived. We have friends in the village, we now know where Sophia lives so we can buy bombitian bread (the only edible bread we’ve found here) and have learned how to eat bits of chicken that We never knew existed without choking on bones! All in all I’m really enjoying my time here and I feel like I’ll really miss the Dominican Republic when it’s time to go home.”

Our very own Christmas Star!

Our very own Christmas Star!

By Erin Kendrick 10B

I filmed A Christmas Star during November and December 2014. After weeks of preparation, we kicked things off by shooting the closing scene of the film at the Belfast City Hall Christmas Lights switch-on. Filming that particular scene, in front of almost 12,000 people, was definitely one of the most exhilarating experiences of my life. The atmosphere was electric and from the moment we walked on stage until the moment when Richard - the director, yelled “That’s a wrap”, we all knew that we were part of something very exciting.

 The next three weeks were both challenging and rewarding. There were many early starts and late finishes and sometimes the weather didn’t do us any favours. In fact, sometimes it was so cold that the wardrobe department had to give me hot water bottles for my coat and hand warmers for my pockets to keep me warm. However, you would have no idea that we were all freezing when you see the film on screen.

 I always started my day on set with breakfast, whether it was from the hotel in which I was staying or a bacon butty from the food-bus on set. Normally my call time was around 9 in the morning, so a car or a minibus would come around 8.15 to pick me up and bring me and other members of the cast to set. When I arrived, I would go to the makeup and wardrobe trailer, which was one of my favourite parts of the day. Once I was camera-ready, I would normally sit and run through my lines with the other actors until I was called to do my scene.

 I have been acting since I was seven and those experiences really helped me on the set of A Christmas Star. I was prepared for the repetition of scenes and the waiting around for camera set up. It also meant that I was able to understand what the crew were saying as they speak a language of abbreviations.

When I filmed my final scene, the cast and crew gave me a huge round of applause. I knew that I was going to miss everyone very much but I know that I will see them all soon at the premiere on the 4th November.

 When people ask me how to “get into” acting, my first piece of advice would be to get involved with Cinemagic. They are making films and training young people like me and you to work in the film industry. They offer master classes, workshops and film events and there is something for everyone. So if you are serious about wanting to be part of the film industry, I recommend Cinemagic as your first port of call.

 

Ruth gets a 'Headstart' in chemistry

Ruth gets a 'Headstart' in chemistry

Last summer I obtained a place on a Headstart Summer School on “Chemistry and Drug Design” at the University of Sussex. I was pretty apprehensive about the whole experience since there were 90 people at the summer school, 89 of whom were English and had no idea where Northern Ireland was!

We researched a possible treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease known as the BACE1 inhibitor. As part of the course I made the molecule, analysed it, tested it to see if it worked and modeled it on a computer. During the week we had a quiz, formal dinner and a trip to GlaxoSmithKline in Brighton. On the penultimate day we summarised our work on a poster and presented it to Academic staff from the university. I won the outstanding achievement award for the Chemistry stream, which was just the perfect end to a perfect week.

I had an amazing time and genuinely loved every minute of the course and it really showed me how much I wanted to study Chemistry at university. I made some really good friends and enjoyed my “undergraduate” experience. I would really recommend Headstart to anyone who is considering doing a STEM degree at university.

By Ruth Crothers